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Joint International Teaching and Learning Conference 2019
CONFERENCE REGISTRATION NOW OPEN: Teaching Politics in an Era of Populism

The Joint International Teaching and Learning Conference is a collaboration between APSA, the Political Studies Association (PSA), the British International Studies Association (BISA), and the European Consortium for Political Research (ECPR). It took place in Brighton, England from June 17-19, 2019.

The program committee consists of representatives from each conference co-sponsor:

Dr. Amanda Rosen and Dr. Tanya Schwarz (American Political Science Association)
Professor John Craig and Dr. Stuart Wilks-Heeg (Political Studies Association)
Professor Nick Robinson (British International Studies Association)
Professor Oddbjørn Knutsen (European Consortium for Political Research)


CONFERENCE THEME

This conference aims to provide a forum in which political science educators from different countries and contexts can come together to explore these challenges and share their experiences and teaching practices. We welcome contributions which explore the challenges faced in national, international, or comparative contexts. We also welcome different approaches to understanding populism and the challenges that it may present to political science educators in different contexts.The rise of populism across North America and Europe in recent decades presents a range of challenges to the teaching of political science and international relations in the universities and colleges. At one level, our curriculum must develop to cover new forms of political activity, the rise of new parties and movements, and new forms of political and government behaviour. But the challenges go beyond simply the content of what we teach. In a political culture in which expertise and established standards of evidence are devalued, political science educators can find themselves portrayed as mere peddlers of opinion and ideology. A range of questions arise, including:

  • Can or should political science education be ‘politically neutral’? Should we nurture values of democracy, equality, and citizenship and, if so, how?
  • How can we support students in developing knowledge, understanding and skills relating to the complex nature of politics, society and government? What role might different approaches to teaching such as simulations, civic engagement and other pedagogies play?
  • What are the challenges of constructing a curriculum and developing learning resources in a period of rapid and sometime dramatic political change?
  • How can we collaborate across different national and educational contexts to support critical learning in political science and international relations? What best practices are there for collaboration in both pedagogical research and cross-cultural classroom experiences?
  • Are there practices or pedagogies from other disciplines that can be adopted or adapted to address these issues?

The call for proposals is now CLOSED.

Click here to read the full call for papers.

 

All questions regarding the conference should be sent to [email protected] or [email protected] (for APSA-specific inquiries).